What I eat in a Day

Hi guys,

Just a quick post to give you a bit of an insight into what my diet looks like on an average day! I would say this is one of the healthier days so perhaps my next ‘What I eat in a Day’ blog will reveal all the naughty things I not so secretly eat.


Breakfast

Breakfast is hands down my favourite meal of the day. When people say they don’t eat breakfast I genuinely feel sad for them for missing out on something so great! I usually have Oats. Luckily for me, this healthy breakfast option is my absolute favourite. If I could I would have oats for breakfast lunch and dinner, I’m not kidding.

So usually in a rush for work I take a container of oats with frozen berries, ground flaxseed and agave nectar. At work I then add hot water. Sometimes I’ll substitute flaxseed for chia seeds, depending on whats in the cupboard. On the weekend when I have a bit more time, and preferably after I have done some sort of fasted cardio, I will cook the oats in almond or oat milk and add cinnamon, raisins, walnuts, cocoa nibs and a chopped banana, with a swirl of agave nectar. The latter is higher in calories, hence the cardio.

breakfast.jpg


Lunch

During the working week I tend to take a packed lunch rather than needlessly spend any spare money going out and buying from the supermarket. I guess I do tend to stick to similar options, which I know if probably a bit boring but a lot of people seem to just have a sandwich so I like to think I switch it up a little bit. I usually either have a wrap, soup or leftovers from dinner the night before. Yesterday I had a Spinach wrap with hummus, siracha, cucumber, mushrooms, spinach and two Linda McCartney Veggie (SFV) sausages.

lunch

Dinner

I try to stick to this rule: Breakfast like a king, lunch like a prince and dine like a pauper. Quite often I go to the gym straight from work and so by the time I get home it’s about 8pm. Therefore I try to have something light otherwise I don’t sleep well. Usually on evenings where Tom and I are both around we will make a big batch of something tasty to last us a few days. This saves time and money. Last night I had leftover lentil bolognese with giant cous cous and curly kale!

Dinner 2


Snacks

I usually have breakfast about 9am and lunch around 2/3pm so I’ll have an apple and a banana as late morning snacks. If I know I’m going straight to the gym I’ll often grab a Trek or Cliff Bar or occasionally I’ll just eat a tin of pulses just to give me some extra energy. Yes, I eat the beans straight from the tin – I don’t care!

So there you have it. This is a particular healthy day to me, although not uncommon really. Look out for my next post which will show you some of the naughtier things I eat!

Thanks for reading – N x

Nicola Rose Streak
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Does wearing faux animal skin and fur products encourage the use of real animal products? Lets discuss.

Fur? In 2018?! I know..

It is fair to say, despite my rage, that fur is making a comeback. A study by Copenhagen University has found that real fur is more popular in the UK than it has been for decades, and that UK fur sales had doubled in the last five years (cited by The BBC in 2016). Despite efforts from animal rights activists across the UK the fur trade seems to be booming. I only have to step onto Reading high-street and within seconds I’ll spot someone wearing coyote, mink or rabbit. It’s both disgusting and heart breaking.

So why is fur making a comeback? Well, it’s largely to do with the fashion industry and their celebrity endorsements. Whilst it gave me some hope to hear in the latter part of 2017 that Gucci pledge to go fur free in 2018 I am still worried by how many influential fashion companies are still buying into the cruel fur industry.

On the topic of celebrity endorsements, the Kardashian’s are apparently the most photographed family in the world and therefore their obsession with wearing dead animals is seen by millions through their social media accounts, as well as on TV and in the press. The Kardashian’s aren’t the only guilty party though, there are many other celebrities on the cruelty waggon, including; Lady Gaga, J-Lo, Kate Moss and Rihanna. But lets not just target women here because men are certainly just as bad. Kanye West, Justin Beiber and Kid Rock are openly proud fur wearers.  It seems for many celebrities that parading around in the skins of dead animals is one of their favourite ways to flaunt their wealth. Whilst members of the public, desperate for some sort of status among their peers are copying the ‘trend’.

The facts about fur

According to Last Chance For Animals each year, more than 1 billion rabbits and 50 million other animals, including foxes, seals, mink, cats and dogs, are raised on fur farms or trapped in the wild and killed for their pelts. Because we import from China and other countries with poor regulation, it can often be mislabelled as “faux.” Depending on the size of the garment, up to 100 animals or more may be killed for a just one coat.

Common ways that animals are trapped involve leg holds, drowning sets and conibear traps which can all leave an animal suffering extreme pain for a lengthy time before they die. Animals are known to chew through their own limbs just to escape.

Please head over to Last Chance For Animals website for more facts about fur.

How can you tell if you’re wearing real fur?

How to spot the difference:

  • Separate the fur at the base. If it’s fake, you will see fabric webbing. If it’s real, it will be attached to skin.
  • The burn test: Clip off the tip of the fibres and set light to them. If they melt like plastic, it’s fake. If they singe and smell of burning hair, it’s real.

How not to spot the difference:

  • Don’t be fooled by the price. It can be cheaper to produce real fur in China than synthetic alternatives.
  • Don’t assume fake fur must be poor quality. It can be difficult to tell fake and real apart because fake fur can be of such good quality.
  • Don’t believe everything you read. Complicated labelling rules are often flouted and the label only has to reflect 80% of the item’s composition so a fur trim may be omitted. Labelling laws do not apply to accessories such as shoes and handbags

So, with all that in mind..

..are we helping or hindering the anti-fur campaigners by wearing faux fur, considering how many people are buying real fur mislabelled as faux? When confronted by activists many members of the public try to defend themselves by saying that they are not aware they are actually wearing real fur. Let’s assume all these people are in fact innocently telling the truth and they didn’t know, they’re still showing us that faux fur is very popular and as long as we continue to import from countries with poor regulations we can’t promise faux is ever really faux.

‘But what about leather?’ I hear you say – and rightly so! There are so many synthetic leathers available now. Whilst this is fantastic and I adore my vegan Doc Martens I do find myself wondering if I’m actually fuelling the ever-popular leather trade in the same way that faux fur might fuel the fur trade. I have noticed myself subconsciously choosing only to wear them around close friends and other vegans, or if I’m out in public not waving the vegan flag. Here’s why…

I go out on the streets and get involved in activism when I can to try and educate the public about the ways in which animals are exploited by humans, as well as to try promote a vegan lifestyle. On occasion I have worn my vegan Doc Martens and I have had members of the public accuse me of being a hypocrite because ‘[your] wearing leather boots!’. My response is usually that if you are that convinced my shoes look like real leather, then I have proven my point that we don’t need to kill animals and wear their skin! However, I can tell that sometimes they just think i’m lying. I find myself wondering if for every one person that spoke out about thinking I wore leather how many other passers by are thinking the same thing without saying anything? So am I really getting people to consider stopping wearing animals or to listen to me about animal exploitation at all? This could apply to any other activist wearing faux fur, wool, suede, silk and so on.

Now, I just want to stress that I am not claiming that we should or shouldn’t be wearing the synthetic alternatives and of course, if we are wearing synthetics we aren’t directly paying for animal cruelty. However, I can’t help but wonder if we are unknowingly persuading others to go out and buy both faux fur (which could and often does turn out to be real) or if people are just going straight for the real fur because they think everyone around them is wearing real fur and therefore it must be okay. If so, should we consider not wearing the alternatives? Again, this post is more me thinking out loud than dictating what other vegans and animal rights activists should do. I would honestly love to hear other peoples thoughts on this topic.

Nxx

fur

Vegan Stick-to-your-ribs Porridge

Nothing is better on a cold, crisp morning than a steaming hot bowl of delicious oats, whilst snuggling under a blanket with a good book. Whats even better is that no animals were harmed in the making of this bowl of greatness, which is naturally good for your heart health.

Good for heart health you say?

Yes! Old-fashioned rolled oats keep you satisfied for longer and naturally contain a form of soluble fibre called oat beta-glucan which dissolves inside the digestive tract to form a paste which binds to excess cholesterol and helps to prevent cholesterol from being absorbed into the body. Nuts are rich in heart-healthy polyunsaturated fats and monounsaturated fats, which lower bad cholesterol. I like to add Cacao nibs as they contain phytonutrients which help absorb free radicals that cause damage in the body. Phytonutrients have been said to enhance immunity, repair DNA damage from exposure to toxins, detoxify carcinogens and alter estrogen metabolism. They can also be found in colourful fruits and vegetables, legumes, nuts, tea, whole grains and many spices.

Whats more, by adding some fruit (I’ve opted for banana and raisins) and an unrefined sweetener like agave nectar you get the natural sweetness that satisfies that pesky sweet craving!

What’s not to love!?

Ingredients

  • 40g Oats (I prefer old-fashioned rolled oats)
  • 10g Flaxseed
  • 20g Walnuts
  • 20g Raisins
  • 1tsp Cinnamon
  • 10g Cocoa Nibs
  • 1 Small Banana, Chopped
  • 1-2 Cups Oat Milk (or other vegan milk – I use Oatly Original)
  • A squirt of Agave Nectar

Directions

  1. Add the Oats, Flaxseed, Walnuts, Raisins and plant milk to a pan.
  2. Bring to boil and turn down the heat. Continually stir, being careful to avoid the oats sticking to the pan.
  3. Add the cinnamon and warm through for 5-10 minutes adding extra milk if the consistency is too thick for your liking.
  4. Transfer to a bowl and add the banana, cocoa nibs and agave nectar.
  5. Fill your belly with goodness!

You’re welcome! xx -N